Visions of Avant-Garde Film: Polish Cinematic Experiments from Expressionism to Constructivism

By Kamila Kuc | Go to book overview

1
“The Cinematograph” and Historical
Consciousness
Actualities as the Earliest Experiments
with Film in the Polish Territories

THE PRIMARY CONCERN of this study is with the appeal and potential of Polish avant-garde film prior to the 1930s. This chapter shows that numerous early Polish texts about film are a valuable source for the analysis of Polish avant-garde film of the 1920s and 1930s. These early considerations became building blocks for later debates around the issue of film as art in independent Poland.

Various critics in the Polish territories analyzed the new cultural and social reality in relation to the freshly emerging artistic movements such as Młoda Polska (Young Poland, 1890–1918).1 In this energetic cultural climate, the formation of cinema as an institution played a pivotal role in understanding the processes associated with the development of modernism in the Polish territories. Polish theoretical discourse concerning “the cinematograph” (and then “film”) between 1896 and 1918 presents an impressive collection of different viewpoints and arguments for and against the notion of the moving image as a new art. Already in the late 1890s numerous Polish writers and filmmakers saw uses for the cinematograph in education, science, and political life. Zygmunt Korosteński and Bolesław Matuszewski, the main subjects of this chapter, perceived the cinematograph as a witness to history. Aside from being a theorist, Matuszewski was a keen photographer (who owned two photographic studios, in Paris and Warsaw) and a filmmaker. His 1898 actuality, The Visit of President Faure in St Petersburg, will be considered here in relation to the early attempts at investigating the ontology of film. Although Matuszewski’s actualities can in no sense be considered avant-garde proper, his interest in the documentary as an alternative mode of production constitutes the main reason for his presence in this study. The shift from actualities to documentary has been characterized by a transformation of the images of the world through the innovative uses of the apparatus. This developed alongside growing experimentation with editing techniques, which affected the evolving patterns of perception internationally, as seen in the example of the Kuleshov effect.

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Visions of Avant-Garde Film: Polish Cinematic Experiments from Expressionism to Constructivism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 230

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.