The Doctrines and Discipline of the African Methodist Episcopal Church

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taken his appointment.” Several respectable white citizens, who knew the coloured people had been ill used, were present, and told us not to fear, for they would see us righted, and not suffer Roberts to preach in a forcible manner: after which Roberts went away.

[Page 8]The next elder stationed in Philadelphia, was Robert Birch, who, following the example of his predecessor, came and published a meeting for himself; but the method just mentioned, was adopted, and he had to go away disappointed. In consequence of this, he applied to the supreme court for a writ of Mandamus, to know why the pulpit was denied him, being elder: this brought on a law suit, which ended in our favour. Thus, by the providence of God, we were delivered from a long, distressing, and expensive suit, which could not be resumed, being determined by the supreme court: for this mercy we desire to be unfeignedly thankful.

About this time, our coloured friends at Baltimore, were treated in a similar manner, by the white preachers and trustees, and many of them drove away; who were disposed to seek a place of worship for themselves, rather than go to law.

Many of the coloured people, in other places, were in a situation nearly like those of Philadelphia and Baltimore, which induced us, last April, to call a general meeting, by way of conference. Delegates from Baltimore, and other places, met those of Philadelphia, and taking into consideration their grievances, and in order to secure their privileges, promote union and harmony among themselves, it was resolved, “That the people of Philadelphia, Baltimore, &c. &c. should become one body, under the name of the African Methodist Episcopal Church.” We have deemed it expedient to have a form of Discipline, whereby we may guide our people in the fear of God, in the unity of the Spirit, and [Page 9] in the bonds of peace, and preserve us from that spiritual despotism which we have so recently experienced—remembering, that we are not to Lord it over God’s heritage, as greedy dogs, that can never have enough; but with long suffering, and bowels of compassion, to bear each other’s burthens, and so fulfil the law of Christ; praying that our mutual striving together, for the promulgation of the gospel, may be crowned with abundant success, we remain your affectionate servants in the kingdom and patience of the Prince of Peace.

RICHARD ALLEN, DANIEL COKER,
JAMES CHAMPION.

-11-

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The Doctrines and Discipline of the African Methodist Episcopal Church
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About This Edition 3
  • Summary 5
  • Title Page 7
  • To the Members of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, in the United States of America 8
  • Proceeding of the Convention 12
  • Chapter I 14
  • Chapter II 53
  • Chapter III 62
  • Part II 95
  • Section I 96
  • Section II 98
  • Section III 99
  • Section IV 100
  • Section V 101
  • Contents 102
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