The Doctrines and Discipline of the African Methodist Episcopal Church

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[Page 96] CHAPTER II.

SECTION I.

The Nature, Design, and general Rules of the United Societies.

(1) IN the latter end of the year 1739, eight or ten persons came to Mr. Wesley in London, who appeared to be deeply convinced of sin, and earnestly groaning for redemption. They desired (as did two or three more the next day) that he would spend some time with them in prayer, and advise them how to flee from the wrath to come; which they saw continually hanging over their heads. That he might have more time for this great work, he appointed a day when they might all come together, which from thence forward they did every week, namely on Thursday in the evening. To these, and as many more as desired to join with them (for their number increased daily) he gave those advices from time to time which he judged most needful for them; and they always concluded their meeting with prayer, suited to their several necessities.

[Page 97](2) This was the rise of the UNITED SOCIETY, first in Europe, and then in America. Such a society is no other than “a company of men having the form and seeking the power of Godliness, united in order to pray together, to receive the word of exhortation, and to watch over one another in love, that they may help each other to work out their salvation.”

(3) That it may the more easily be discerned, whether they are indeed working out their own salvation, each society is divided into smaller companies, (called classes) according to their respective places of abode.—There

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The Doctrines and Discipline of the African Methodist Episcopal Church
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • About This Edition 3
  • Summary 5
  • Title Page 7
  • To the Members of the African Methodist Episcopal Church, in the United States of America 8
  • Proceeding of the Convention 12
  • Chapter I 14
  • Chapter II 53
  • Chapter III 62
  • Part II 95
  • Section I 96
  • Section II 98
  • Section III 99
  • Section IV 100
  • Section V 101
  • Contents 102
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