Seeing Is Believing: How the New Art of Visual Management Can Boost Performance throughout Your Organization

By Stewart Liff; Pamela A. Posey | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
Why Visual Is Important

The world of work today is unlike the world of work that our parents or their parents faced. Before the introduction of automation and robotics, our assembly lines moved at a slower pace; before the advances in telecommunications, we discussed problems and their solutions face-to-face; before the Internet became widely available, we worked in physical teams rather than virtual teams; and before we became part of a globally interconnected economy, we could still manage much of the information that came our way within our own companies. Just as robotics, telecommunications, and computer technology have changed the face of work, they have also changed the way in which people gather, interpret, and make sense of the information around them. Today, the means by which people deal with information rely heavily on visual cues for the proper and rapid transmission and receipt of messages.

Have you wondered whatever happened to the days of steady growth, predictable change, and manageable transition? Or are you one of the generation who wonders what older workers and managers are talking about when they discuss moving an organization forward sequentially, one step at a time? Are you a technological dinosaur, or are you a person who grew up with computers, PDAs, and cell phones? Do you remember the first television in your neighborhood, or do you still wonder how people can manage without multiscreen receivers and cable or satellite transmission? Is change something that you worry about, or is it such a natural part of your life that you

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