Losing Our Democratic Spirit: Congressional Deliberation and the Dictatorship of Propaganda

By Bill Granstaff | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In the course of preparing this book, I have incurred debts to a number of good friends, good coaches, and good examples.

I must begin by thanking Professors Allen Hertzke, Ron Peters, and Gary Copeland at the Carl Albert Congressional Research and Studies Center at the University of Oklahoma. As a Carl Albert Fellow, I greatly benefited from numerous conversations and reviews regarding this project. In addition, LaDonna Sullivan and Kellye Walker provided valuable help at various times. All told, the Carl Albert Center facilitated this research.

I next want to acknowledge a great debt of gratitude to Dr. Dan Nimmo for his perspectives and insights, which are central to this work. His counsel regarding various problems along the way is also much appreciated.

During my stay in Washington, D.C., I worked as an American Political Science Congressional Fellow for Congressman Eric Fingerhut (DOhio). I want to thank the congressman, Sharon Gang, Kim Greco, Brett and Karen Kaull, Larry McClemons, Russ and Brenda Nicely, Sandy Brown, and Rob Herman for their good humor, their insights, their patience, and their support during fiscal year 1994.

I also want to thank my friend, Dan Young, and my sister, Kristen Sparks-Quinn, for their attention, their time, and their many valuable suggestions throughout the preparation of this manuscript.

-xv-

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Losing Our Democratic Spirit: Congressional Deliberation and the Dictatorship of Propaganda
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Series Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Chapter 1 - The Democratic Connection 1
  • Chapter 2 - Stereotypes and Conventions 15
  • Chapter 3 - The Power of Language 41
  • Chapter 4 - Tools 59
  • Chapter 5 - The Lebanon Difficulty 95
  • Chapter 6 - The Persian Gulf Difficulty 137
  • Chapter 7 - The Somalia Difficulty 165
  • Chapter 8 - The Emperor’s Clothes 189
  • References 215
  • Index 221
  • About the Author 227
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