Losing Our Democratic Spirit: Congressional Deliberation and the Dictatorship of Propaganda

By Bill Granstaff | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
The Democratic Connection

If you are going to have representative government, where else do
you want it but when you decide whether or not the citizens of this
country live or die?

—Senator Lloyd Bentsen (D-Tex.) (Cong. Rec. 1983c: 26054)

I do not believe … there is another issue that the executive or legis-
lative branch takes more seriously than that of sending the young
men and women of our country into harm’s way. Such a serious step
should never be taken without the fullest consideration by the ex-
ecutive branch, and I would underscore this, and the fullest delib-
eration possible by this, the legislative branch.

—Congressman Ron Dellums (D-Calif.) (Cong. Rec. 1993b: H2613)

On September 28, 1983, the House of Representatives was resolved into the Committee of the Whole House to deliberate a life and death question: Should the U.S. government continue to place its soldiers’ lives at risk as a participant in the multinational peacekeeping force in Lebanon? The two significant alternatives at issue were the Multinational Force in Lebanon Resolution (H. J. Res. 364), which authorized the deployment for 18 months, and a substitute measure written by Congressmen Clarence Long (D-Md.) and David Obey (D-Wis.) that sanctioned the deployment, but also required the president to adhere more strictly with the War Powers Act (Cong. Rec. 1983c: 26108). Congressman Tom Lantos

-1-

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Losing Our Democratic Spirit: Congressional Deliberation and the Dictatorship of Propaganda
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Tables ix
  • Series Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xv
  • Chapter 1 - The Democratic Connection 1
  • Chapter 2 - Stereotypes and Conventions 15
  • Chapter 3 - The Power of Language 41
  • Chapter 4 - Tools 59
  • Chapter 5 - The Lebanon Difficulty 95
  • Chapter 6 - The Persian Gulf Difficulty 137
  • Chapter 7 - The Somalia Difficulty 165
  • Chapter 8 - The Emperor’s Clothes 189
  • References 215
  • Index 221
  • About the Author 227
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