Shakespeare and Son: A Journey in Writing and Grieving

By Keverne Smith | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

One of our culture’s caricatures is the starlet who wins an Oscar and wishes to thank everyone, from her earliest teacher onward. But beneath the cliché is a truth. I have been fascinated by the topic of grief in Shakespeare since I was an undergraduate more years ago than I care to disclose, and many people have indirectly contributed to my project, even before I started to investigate the topic consciously almost a decade ago (as far as the demands of teaching—very enjoyable and rewarding—and ever increasing administrative duties—decidedly not—allowed). So in writing an acknowledgment list that is not as long as a chapter, I am aware that there is an injustice towards, for instance, the excellent English teacher I had from the age of 13 onward, Keith Stevens.

More recently, my wife Caroline, David Bevington, Silvia Holden, René Weis, Stanley Wells, and the late Stephen Wenman have very kindly read the whole of my draft manuscript at various stages in its development, and Sarah Brown, Valerie Wayne and Katrin Wilhelm have generously read sections. I have gained beyond measure from reflecting on their helpful comments and suggestions, although of course, I have not always agreed with them. It is a particular sadness that Stephen, who was an excellent mature student, has not been able to see how my final revision bears the imprint of his friendly honesty. Indeed, I have been overwhelmed by the generosity of colleagues in the international community of scholarship in responding to e-mails and other requests for information from someone, in most cases, they did not know. This is very encouraging in a world where communal values are increasingly under attack from

-xi-

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