Shakespeare and Son: A Journey in Writing and Grieving

By Keverne Smith | Go to book overview

13
Grief, Ceremony, and Repeated
Restoration: Behold Divineness/
No Elder Than a Boy

The Winter’s Tale acknowledged that a bereaved father might find it unbearable to think about and hear his son “talked of,” although many years had passed since the death, but equally that the child needed to be thought about and “talked of.” Cymbeline, probably written shortly before or shortly after The Winter’s Tale (or even overlapping with it), was seen by Simon Forman towards the end of April 1611; again this may have been a first or early performance. In it Shakespeare recognizes more than ever before that a dead child needs to be mourned ritualistically, and that the ritual might have to be of the mourner’s invention.

Set in a Britain under the threat of Roman invasion in the years before the birth of Christ, Cymbeline is not well-known or popular, and it is easy to see why: the play is one of Shakespeare’s longest and contains his most complicated plot—convoluted might be a better word—at times proving hard to follow even for theatergoers familiar with his works. Why did he, with 20 years and more theatrical experience, write such a difficult-tofollow and lengthy play? The answer is complex, involving such political matters as the wish to set part of the play in Wales in honor of the investiture of Henry as Prince of Wales in June 1610; but the aspect I will concentrate on lies in the need to contrive a situation where ceremonial mourning can be introduced into the plot.1 James Nosworthy sensed

-155-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Shakespeare and Son: A Journey in Writing and Grieving
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 199

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.