Plagiarism and Literary Property in the Romantic Period

By Tilar J. Mazzeo | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Coleridge, Plagiarism, and Narrative
Mastery

The critical tradition surrounding Romantic-period plagiarism has been almost exclusively focused on the transgressions of a single poet, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and one of the claims of this book is the contention that such silent literary appropriations were far more widespread and common among writers of the period and were viewed according to historically distinct standards of intellectual property. However, it is worth considering at the outset why Coleridge’s particular borrowings have sparked such controversy and sustained interest. That Coleridge’s debts to other writers are substantial is undeniable. They were catalogued piecemeal for readers as early as the nineteenth century, and Norman Fruman’s monumental work, Coleridge: The Damaged Archangel, effectively settled the questions of whether the poet had unacknowledged sources and what they were. However, had the critical tradition simply documented Coleridge’s borrowings, the case would be less interesting. Instead, Coleridge himself—his motivations, his evasions, his character—has frequently become the real subject of analysis. To observe this is not a criticism of the scholars who have shaped this tradition: the trajectory was, in a sense, inevitable. Coleridge himself cast his plagiarisms in terms of the unconscious, and Thomas DeQuincey, in his infamous 1834 serial exposé of the poet, characterized Coleridge’s most culpable intellectual debts as a personal neurosis. The psychological analysis of Coleridge’s plagiarisms, then, began almost from the moment the borrowings were publicly noted, and since the nineteenth century the question of consciousness has continued to shape some of the most important works of Coleridgean criticism, with the poet’s defenders evoking his prodigious powers of memory or eccentric work habits and with his critics documenting the extent of his obligations and deceptions. However, while Coleridge’s debts have been extensively catalogued, neither the constructions of plagiarism nor of the unconscious, as Coleridge and his Romantic

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Plagiarism and Literary Property in the Romantic Period
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 236

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.