Plagiarism and Literary Property in the Romantic Period

By Tilar J. Mazzeo | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Abelove, Henry. “John Wesley’s Plagiarism of Samuel Johnson and Its Contemporary Reception.” Huntington Library Quarterly 59:1 (1997): 73–79.

Abrams, M. H. The Mirror and the Lamp. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1953.

Adams, Percy. Travel Literature and the Evolution of the Novel. Lexington: University Press of Kentucky, 1983.

———. Travelers and Travel Liars, 1660–1800. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1962.

Altieri, Charles. “Can We Be Historical Ever? Some Hopes for a Dialectical Model of Historical Self-Consciousness.” The Uses of Literary History. Ed. Marshall Brown. Durham, N.C.: Duke University Press, 1995.

Anonymous. “An Address to the Parliament of Great Britain, on the Claims of Authors to their Own Copyright.” The Pamphleteer: Respectfully Dedicated to Both Houses of Parliament 3 (September 1813): 169–202.

———. “Article XI.” The Quarterly Review 16 (1816–17): 225–79.

———. “Case of Walcot v. Walker; Southey v. Sherwood; Murray v. Benbow; and Lawrence v. Smith.” The Quarterly Review 27 (1822): 123–38.

———. “Filicaja.” The Retrospective Review 10:2 (1824): 317.

———. “Lord Byron vindicated from alleged Plagiarism.” The Gentleman’s Magazine 88 (May 1818): 390–91.

———. “Plagiarisms of Lord Byron Detected.” The Monthly Magazine 52 (August 1821): 19–22; 52 (September 1821): 105–9.

———. “The Plagiarisms of Lord Byron.” The Gentleman’s Magazine 88 (February 1818): 121.

———. Reasons for the Modification of the Act of Anne Respecting the Delivery of Books and Copyright. London: Nichols, Son, and Bentley, 1813.

Armstrong, Isobel, and Virginia Blain, eds. Women’s Poetry, Late Romantic to Late Victorian: Genre and Genre, 1830–1900. Houndsmill: Macmillan, 1999.

Baines, Paul. The House of Forgery in Eighteenth-Century Britain. Brookfield: Ashgate, 1999.

Barrell, John. The Idea of the Landscape and the Sense of Place, 1730–1840: An Approach to the Poetry of John Clare. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1972.

Barthes, Roland. Image, Music, Text. Trans. Stephen Heath. New York: Hill, 1977.

———. The Pleasure of the Text. Trans. Richard Miller. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1986.

———. The Rustle of Language. New York: Hill and Wang, 1986.

Bayley, Peter. Poems. London: William Millar, 1803.

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