Plagiarism and Literary Property in the Romantic Period

By Tilar J. Mazzeo | Go to book overview

Index
Adams, Percy, 109
Addison, Joseph, 82
Altieri, Charles, xii
anonymous publication, 83, 109–11
Augustan literature, 12, 14. See also neoclassical aesthetics
authorship: assumptions regarding solitary genius, ix, xi, xiii, 6–7, 16, 30, 182, 186–88; commercial or professional, ix, xii, 54–62, 66, 75, 81, 85, 95–96, 123–24, 144, 166–75; poststructuralist theories of, xi, xiii, 1, 6–7, 147, 186–88; pre-Romantic constructions of, xiii, 1. See also gender
ballads, 49, 54, 70–85. See also Wordsworth, William
Barrell, John, 157
Barthes, Roland, 6, 47–48, 196–97 n.27
Bayley, Peter, 15–6, 103, 119, 147–49, 152, 207–8 n.10
Beach, Joseph Warren, 46
Beattie, James, 178
Beaumont, Francis, and John Fletcher, 151
Beckford, William, 108, 111, 116
Bennett, Andrew, 85, 153
Bently, Lionel, 11
Birns, Nicholas, 137
Blackstone, William, 51–53
Blessington, Marguerite Gardiner, countess of, 116, 119–21
Bloom, Harold (The Anxiety of Influence), 136
Bloomfield, Robert, 179
Bonjour, Adrien, 46, 56
Boruchoff, David, 182, 187
Bostetter, Edward, 30, 195 n.12
Bradley, A. C., 3, 190 n.2
Brewer, William, 180
Brown, Capability, 145
Brownlow, Timothy, 145–46
Brun, (Sophie Christiane) Friederike, 18–19, 45–46, 50, 55–57, 62
Burgher, Gottfried August, 75, 82
Burke, Edmund, 15
Burke, Sean, xiii
Burns, Robert, 176
Byron, George Gordon, lord: accused of plagiarism, x, xii, 2, 8, 41, 44, 73, 86, 106, 144– 45, 147; concern with textual unity, 128, 130; conflict with William Wordsworth, 44, 86–87, 94–96, 106–7, 119, 144, 147; debts in Childe Harold, 94–107, 111, 144; debts to Coleridge, 91–94, 96–97, 100–101, 110, 116; debts to Continental literature, 104–7, 116– 21, 202–3 n.15, 204 n.30; debts in Deformed Transformed, 119; debts in Don Juan, 43, 94, 107–13, 115–19; debts in oriental tales, 87–94; debts to travel writing, so, 86, 90– 91, 105, 107–13, 115–17, 123, 127–28; debts to William Wordsworth, 96, 100–101, 201–2 n.7; and empire, 112–16; investment in persona, 98–104, 111, 143, 201 n.2; and Lake School poets, 100–102; literary failure of, 98–104; literary property, attitude toward, 11, 87; originality, attitude toward, 112–16; peasant poets, attitude toward, 179–80; reputation as poet, 28, 54, 86–89, 176; resented by John Clare, 179–80; social class as factor, 121, 166; unconscious, attitude toward, 119–21
Calderon de la Barca, Pedro, 134
Campbell, Thomas, 127–28, 159–60, 196 n.25
Casti, Giambattista, 116–19
Chatteron, Thomas, 23, 72–73, 174–75
Christensen, Jerome, 47, 196 n.25
Clairmont, Claire, 136
Clare, John, x, 2, 8, 176–81, 184
class: related to charges of plagiarism, ix–x, 173–81; genteel or aristocratic contexts, so, 66, 95–96, 121, 129, 144, 157; related to labor and social ascendancy, 146, 158–65, 173–81

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