Plagiarism and Literary Property in the Romantic Period

By Tilar J. Mazzeo | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

In the course of this study I return repeatedly to questions of circulation, collaboration, and community, arguing that these values were central to the project of literary Romanticism, and, if my experience is any indication, the spirit of Romanticism is alive and well. Without the assistance of many colleagues and friends, this work would not have been possible, and I cannot properly recognize here the many voices that informed this project. There are several people, however, to whom I owe particular and substantial debts of gratitude. I am grateful to Sam Baker, Anna-Lisa Cox, Marilyn Gaull, Brean Hammond, Gary Handwerk, Nigel Leask, Carol Levin, Michael Macovski, Anne Mellor, Rob Mitchell, Mona Modiano, Margaret Russett, Dror Wahrman, the 2003–4 Newberry Library seminar participants, and my colleagues in the Department of English at Colby College for critiques, comments, and conversations that helped to shape the direction of this book in different ways. Among those colleagues at Colby, special thanks to Ira Sadoff and Adrian Blevins for fruitful exchanges about poetry and the inheritance of Romanticism. It is with great affection that I thank Jeff Cox, Michael Gamer, Greg Kucich, Dan White, and Paul Youngquist, along with Tim Fulford, for the many conversations that enriched this study and for the important personal friendships that make working in Romanticism such a pleasure. Noelle Baker and Roberta Maguire epitomized collegiality and many other virtues; along with Jérémie Fant and Jeremy and Paula Lowe, they provided intellectual sustenance and much more in lean times. I owe to Hazard Adams the enduring and very particular debt that all students owe to superb teachers. And, above all, my profound thanks and love to Thaine Stearns, for listening to it all with generosity and care and devotion and for always believing that everything was necessary.

This work could not have been completed without the financial generosity of several institutions. The Monticello Foundation Fellowship at the Newberry Library, the Andrew Mellon and Michael J. Connell Fellowships at the Huntington Library, the Keats-Shelley Association of America, and Pembroke College, University of Cambridge provided time and support at

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