From Pentecost to the Triune God: A Pentecostal Trinitarian Theology

By Steven M. Studebaker | Go to book overview

Epilogue

The complaint in contemporary theology about the neglect of pneumatology and the call for a recovery of the doctrine of the Trinity may have become clichés. Nonetheless, these areas of theology remain vital areas for constructive efforts in the emerging Pentecostal theological tradition — and established ones as well. This volume is an effort to contribute not only to Pentecostal theology in general and to its Trinitarian theology in particular, but also to the other theological traditions. It began with the conviction that the charismatic experience of the Holy Spirit is a defining feature of the Pentecostal movement and has theological significance. It is not a turn to a fickle subjective theology but is an affirmation that at the root of this experience is the Holy Spirit, and thus this feature should be taken seriously in a Pentecostal theology, as well as having something to say to other theological traditions. It then turned to Scripture, and the central place of the Pentecostal experience of the Spirit found corroboration with the Spirit’s climactic role in the biblical drama of redemption.

The investigation of the biblical narratives of the Spirit suggests that the Holy Spirit is an active divine person who consummates the fellowship of the Trinitarian God and plays a co-constitutional role in the formation of the personal identities of the Father and the Son. The ecumenical yield of a Pentecostal Trinitarian theology is to supplement the traditional tendency to treat the Spirit as a passive and derivative procession from the Father — or from the Father and the Son — with a more active and complementary role of the Holy Spirit in the Trinity. This theology not only supports the person status of the Holy Spirit, but also the reciprocal nature

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From Pentecost to the Triune God: A Pentecostal Trinitarian Theology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Pentecostal Manifestos i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments viii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - A Pentecostal Approach to the Trinity 11
  • 2 - The Holy Spirit and the Trinity 53
  • 3 - Eastern and Western Trinitarian Theology 101
  • 4 - Reformed Evangelical Trinitarian Theology 147
  • 5 - Charismatic Trinitarian Theology 187
  • 6 - The Spirit of Pentecost and Theology of Religions 208
  • 7 - The Spirit of Pentecost and Creation 240
  • Epilogue 269
  • Index of Names 271
  • Index of Subjects 275
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