Days of Knight: How the General Changed My Life

By Kirk Haston | Go to book overview

Introduction

How does an eighteen-year-old from a small town in Tennessee, who went to a high school with 300 students, go to Indiana University and the Big Ten to play basketball for one of the greatest basketball coaches in the history of the game, Coach Bob Knight? It’s still hard to imagine how I managed to travel down that road, and when I started there was no way I realized that my decision to be a Hoosier and play for Coach Knight would positively impact my life to such a degree. I also had no way of knowing that my first three seasons at Indiana would be the last three seasons that Knight would coach there.

My mom, Patti Kirk Haston, gave me a great gift and a terrific piece of advice when I left for Bloomington for the first time in the summer of 1997. She gave me a journal and told me, “You’ll be glad someday that you wrote some things down about playing for Coach Knight.” This suggestion was similar to most of the advice I received from my mom—it was absolutely correct. During my years of playing for Coach Knight I wrote down pages and pages of stories, quotes, comments, and conversations that I was fortunate enough to experience as an Indiana Hoosier. Almost every day during the season I wrote notes in my journal and also in my red notebook, a notebook that Coach Knight gave to each player and required us to have at every team meet-

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Days of Knight: How the General Changed My Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • What Others Are Saying about Days of Knight 1
  • Title Page 7
  • Contents 10
  • Introduction 13
  • 1 - If the Game Doesn’t Fit … Then You Didn’t Commit 17
  • 2 - Tennessee Knight Game 23
  • 3 - The Day after Knight 38
  • 4 - Welcome to B-Town Greenhorn 44
  • 5 - A Hall of Fame Kind of Day 55
  • 6 - Talking about Practice 66
  • 7 - Hoosier Family Counseling 86
  • 8 - This Is … Assembly Hall 102
  • 9 - Close to Greatness & Close to Great Failures 129
  • 10 - Let the Games Begin 139
  • 11 - Phone Call 146
  • 12 - An Intolerable Policy? 162
  • 13 - Friendship Tolerance 172
  • 14 - Number 1 Comes to Town 182
  • 15 - Day Camp and Knight Chats 190
  • 16 - Image Is Something, but Not Everything 208
  • Acknowledgments 219
  • Bibliography 222
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