Days of Knight: How the General Changed My Life

By Kirk Haston | Go to book overview

12
An Intolerable Policy?

What exactly was the infamous zero-tolerance policy that garnered so much attention during Coach Knight’s final year at Indiana? That’s a question that many, even those who lived through the fiasco that was Coach Knight’s dismissal, still have a difficult time answering even today. Perhaps with the help of some of the exact language that was in the zero-tolerance policy, we can once and for all understand what this policy was all about as it pertained to Coach Knight at Indiana in 2000:

Public presentations and other occasions during
which coach Knight is a representative of Indiana
University will be conducted with the appropriate
decorum and civility. Included among these
occasions are interactions with the news media.
Failure to do so will be cause for further sanction,
up to and including termination from the position
of basketball coach. A task force will be established
to develop policies for appropriate behavior for
all coaches, athletic department employees and

-162-

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Days of Knight: How the General Changed My Life
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • What Others Are Saying about Days of Knight 1
  • Title Page 7
  • Contents 10
  • Introduction 13
  • 1 - If the Game Doesn’t Fit … Then You Didn’t Commit 17
  • 2 - Tennessee Knight Game 23
  • 3 - The Day after Knight 38
  • 4 - Welcome to B-Town Greenhorn 44
  • 5 - A Hall of Fame Kind of Day 55
  • 6 - Talking about Practice 66
  • 7 - Hoosier Family Counseling 86
  • 8 - This Is … Assembly Hall 102
  • 9 - Close to Greatness & Close to Great Failures 129
  • 10 - Let the Games Begin 139
  • 11 - Phone Call 146
  • 12 - An Intolerable Policy? 162
  • 13 - Friendship Tolerance 172
  • 14 - Number 1 Comes to Town 182
  • 15 - Day Camp and Knight Chats 190
  • 16 - Image Is Something, but Not Everything 208
  • Acknowledgments 219
  • Bibliography 222
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