Carolina Israelite: How Harry Golden Made Us Care about Jews, the South, and Civil Rights

By Kimberly Marlowe Hartnett | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE
Only in America

Back in Golden’s heyday, who could have imagined that the daily news sources of choice for millions of people in the twenty-first century would be niche cable channels with clear political biases or comedian-commentators serving up the latest happenings in Washington? Or that blogs and YouTube would exist and make politicians’ fumbles impossible to sweep under the carpet? The seriously wounded newspaper business and a world in which anyone with a cell phone can become a broadcaster combined to dig up and replant the playing field in ways unthinkable in Golden’s era. As he would have said, in his raspy drawl, “Only in America … yeahhhh.”

A pop writer’s legacy is hard to trace. It is too simple to say that Golden begat this or that later pundit or style, but a look back at the evolution of his ideas and energy, and the writing that made him stand out in the 1950s and 1960, is revealing. In fact, Golden pioneered much of what is right with this New Media world. Here was a smart and accessible writer, a master of the short form, refusing to go fully or quietly into any pigeonhole; he was simultaneously a humorist, a Jewish writer, a civil rights agitator, and a storyteller. He was a troublemaker, a personality who both participated in and reported on the momentous civil rights story, rejecting many of the rules of engagement for traditional journalists. He forced vitally important issues into the public dialogue. He was a blogger, even if the term had yet

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Carolina Israelite: How Harry Golden Made Us Care about Jews, the South, and Civil Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Carolina Israelite i
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter One - Putting Down Roots in the: Goldeneh Medina 9
  • Chapter Two - Heading South 49
  • Chapter Three - A New Life and a New Cause in Dixie 79
  • Chapter Four - Brown, Flames, and Fame 113
  • Chapter Five - Scandal and Resurrection 157
  • Chapter Six - Ghosts and Great Men 189
  • Chapter Seven - Grief, Hope, and Black Power 219
  • Chapter Eight - The Real Iron Curtain 245
  • Epilogue - Only in America 261
  • Notes 269
  • Bibliography 327
  • Index 345
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