Psychotherapies for the Psychoses: Theoretical, Cultural and Clinical Integration

By John F.M. Gleeson; Eóin Killackey et al. | Go to book overview

Introduction to Section 2

Eóin Killackey

One of the common and valid complaints about most of the literature concerning interventions for schizophrenia is that it is produced by those working in developed western settings. This is supported by the fact that 80 per cent of the 5000 randomized controlled trials in the database of the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group are from western countries (Gaebel and Weinman, 2006). Usually, where this information is about diagnosis or techniques in treatment there may be a token sentence such as ‘local cultural practices may need to be taken into account’, or ‘presentation may vary dependent on culture’.

In this section of the book we have attempted to address this imbalance which typically pervades the literature. Four chapters are included here which focus upon different aspects of treatment for schizophrenia, psychoses, or for those at risk of these illnesses.

In Chapter 5, Tor K. Larsen describes Norwegian efforts to integrate biological and psychological interventions and outlines how this goal has been translated into treatment guidelines in Norway and specific programmes.

In Chapter 6, Traceyanne Herewini writes about the way in which Maaori concepts are joined by western concepts of treatment in New Zealand. While many formerly colonized countries make statements about respecting indigenous cultures, New Zealand does this more so than many others. This chapter is not only a fascinating insight into the complexities of this, but also a spur to action for how other countries may start to think about addressing the mental health needs of their indigenous peoples.

In Chapter 7, Lisa J. Phillips and colleagues survey the way in which three centres around the world are approaching psychological interventions for those at risk of developing psychosis. Studies from this area show that psychological interventions have an important role in this developing area (Killackey and Yung, 2007).

Finally, in Chapter 8, Ishita Sanyal writes about the challenges facing those in India who are attempting to integrate psychosocial recovery into the approaches of treatment for mental illness. This is interesting because India is a culture which is rapidly changing due to economic development. This

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