The First Epistle to the Corinthians: A Commentary on the Greek Text

By Anthony C. Thiselton | Go to book overview

Introduction

I. ROMAN CORINTH IN THE TIME OF PAUL:
GEOGRAPHY, ARCHAEOLOGY, SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS,
PROSPERITY, AND CULTURE OF PRAGMATIC PLURALISM

A. Geography, Commercial Prosperity, and Roman Foundation

The first feature about the ancient city of Corinth which strikes the modern visitor, especially from the height of Acrocorinth above the ancient site, is its distinctive geographical situation at the crossroads or intersection between east and west and between north and south.1 In the ancient world the significance of the strategic position not least for commercial prosperity was noted by Pausanias (c. ad 170) and by Strabo (c. 7 bc, slightly revised ad 18, in the case of Corinth on the basis of a visit perhaps c. 29 bc).2 Strabo writes: “Corinth is called ‘wealthy’ because of its commerce, since it is situated on the Isthmus and is master of two harbours, of which one leads straight to Asia, and the other to Italy; and it makes easy the exchange of merchandise from both countries.”3 The harbor of Cenchreae faces east across the Saronic Gulf to Asia and Ephesus; the harbor of Lechaeum faces west (or north-west) across the Corinthian Gulf to Italy and the west.4 Cenchreae lies c. 5 to 8 kilometers east of the ancient city; Lechaeum, 2 kilometers to the north.

Virtually all modern classical and archaeological studies confirm the commercial importance of the diolkos, a paved roadway built across the isthmus originally in the sixth century bc at its narrowest point of less than six kilometers.5 It was used for the transportation of cargo or even light ships,

1. On Acrocorinth (1884 feet or 574 meters) and the geography of Corinthia (the territorium of Corinth) see Donald Engels, Roman Corinth: An Alternative Model for the Classical City (Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1990), 8-14; and J. B. Salmon, Wealthy Corinth: A History of the City to 338 BC (Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1984).

2. Pausanias, Journey through Greece, bk. 2; Strabo, Geography 8.6.

3. Strabo, Geography 8.6.20. See further J. Murphy-O’Connor, St Paul’s Corinth: Texts and Archaeology (Wilmington: Glazier, 1983), 6-10, 51-54.

4. Of multiple sources, cf., e.g., Pausanias, Description of Greece 2.1.5-7; in modern literature James Wiseman, “Corinth and Rome I 228 bc–ad 267,” in ANRW 2.7.1 (Berlin: de Gruyter, 1979), 439-47 (cf. 438-548); map on 440; Engels, Roman Corinth, 8-21.

5. Wiseman, Corinth and Rome, 441; Engels, Roman Corinth, 50-52.

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The First Epistle to the Corinthians: A Commentary on the Greek Text
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 1446

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.