Life and Adventures of Nat Love, Better Known in the Cattle Country as "Deadwood Dick," by Himself

By Nat Love | Go to book overview

[Page 14] CHAPTER II
WAR. “THE REBELS AND YANKEES.” I RAISE A
REGIMENT TO FIGHT. DIFFICULTY IN FINDING
AN ENEMY. ASH CAKE. FREEDOM.

When I was ten years old the war broke out between the “North and the South.” And there was little else talked about, among the slaves as well as the slave owners of the neighborhood. And naturally the many different stories we heard worked us children to a high state of excitement. So much so that we wanted to go to war, and fight for the Union, because among us slave children there was no difference of opinion, as to which side was right.

The Union was “IT,” and we were all “Yankees.” Not being able to go to war as our masters did, we concluded to play war, accordingly I gathered all the boys of the neighborhood together, into a regiment, which it was my intention to divide into two parties of Rebels and Yankees, but in this I met an insurmountable obstacle. Not one of the boys wanted to be a rebel, consequently we had to look elsewhere for an enemy to give us battle, and serve as a vent for our growing enthusiasm. The next Sunday preceding the organization of our regiment, we started out over the surrounding country in quest of trouble, which we were not long in finding, as we soon ran across a nest of yellow jackets. These we proceeded to exterminate, in which we were successful after a short but destructive battle. We suffered considerably in wounded but lost none of our soldiers. This engagement we called the capture of fort “Hell.” For some time thereafter we made regular raids into the surrounding country in quest of an enemy. We were eventually successful in our quest, as in quick order we ran across and captured a company of bumble bees. This we called the “Battle of the Wilderness.” Victory over a nest of hornets we called the capture of “Fort Sumter.”

-25-

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