Reading, Writing & Race: The Desegregation of the Charlotte Schools

By Davison M. Douglas | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I received a tremendous amount of support along the way in writing this book. The staff of the following libraries were most helpful in allowing me to use their manuscript collections: the Special Collections at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, the Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County, the Southern Historical Collection and the North Carolina Collection at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the North Carolina State Archives in Raleigh, and the Manuscripts Division of the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. In addition, the Charlotte Observer graciously opened its files to me, as did the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Community Relations Committee. The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Public Schools, the Charlotte Chamber of Commerce, and the United States Courthouse in Charlotte also provided valuable assistance. Carlton Watkins and Paul Ervin, Jr., allowed me to examine their personal papers. The library staff and administration at the William and Mary Law School were particularly supportive of my research efforts. I am also very grateful to the National Endowment for the Humanities and the William and Mary Law School, both of which provided me with generous financial support.

Many people assisted me in this project. My two dissertation advisers at Yale University, John Blum and John Butler, each gave me a great deal of critical encouragement and support at various stages of my work. Drew Days, Neal Devins, Steven Gillon, David Goldfield, Paul LeBel, William Link, Michael Okun, Rodney Smolla, Mark Tushnet, and Stephen Wasby each read earlier drafts of the book and offered valuable criticism. Ellen Ferris, Erin Hawkins, Jonathan Koenig, John McGowan, Joan Pearlstein, Manesh Rath, and Stephen Schofield tirelessly and cheerfully helped me track down endless newspaper articles and cases.

I would also like to thank the staffs of the Northwestern University Law Review and the Chicago-Kent Law Review. Chapter 2 first appeared in revised form in the fall 1994 issue of the Northwestern University Law Review. Parts of chapters 3 and 4 first appeared in the spring 1995 issue of the Chicago-Kent Law Review.

At the University of North Carolina Press, executive editor Lewis Bateman, editor Pamela Upton, and copyeditor Teddy Diggs each provided valuable encouragement and assistance and greatly strengthened the book.

-xi-

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