Reading, Writing & Race: The Desegregation of the Charlotte Schools

By Davison M. Douglas | Go to book overview

Notes

INTRODUCTION

1 There are a number of biographies of Martin Luther King, including Garrow, Bearing the Cross, and Branch, Parting the Waters. For the institutions mentioned, see, e.g., Tushnet, The NAACP’s Legal Strategy against Segregated Education; Meier and Rudwick, CORE; Carson, In Struggle; Fairclough, To Redeem the Soul of America.

2. Burk, The Eisenhower Administration; Brauer, John F. Kennedy; Dudziak, “Desegregation as a Cold War Imperative”; Orfield, The Reconstruction of Southern Education; Read and McGough, Let Them Be Judged; Kluger, Simple Justice; Burstein, Discrimination, Jobs, and Politics; Peltason, FiftyEight Lonely Men; Rosenberg, The Hollow Hope; Wilkinson, From Brown to Bakke.

3 See, e.g., Chafe, Civilities and Civil Rights; Colburn, Racial Change and Community Crisis; Norrell, Reaping the Whirlwind; Lukas, Common Ground; Formisano, Boston against Busing; Pratt, The Color of Their Skin; Freyer, The Little Rock Crisis; Dittmer, Local People.

4 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas, 347 U.S. 483 (1954).

5 See Tushnet, The NAACP’s Legal Strategy against Segregated Education; Kluger, Simple Justice.

6 Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education, 402 U.S. 1 (1971).

7 See, e.g., Bass, Unlikely Heroes; Greenberg, Crusaders in the Courts; Kluger, Simple Justice; Read and McGough, Let Them Be Judged; Yarbrough, Judge Frank Johnson.

8 See, e.g., Branch, Parting the Waters; Garrow, Protest at Selma; Graham, The Civil Rights Era; Rosenberg, The Hollow Hope.

9 See Chafe, Civilities and Civil Rights, who discusses the manner in which the white community of Greensboro used the ethic of “civility” in matters of race to mask the preservation of certain racial roles.

10 Jacoway and Colburn, Southern Businessmen and Desegregation.

11 Bell, “Brown v. Board of Education and the Interest-Convergence Dilemma”; Dudziak, “Desegregation as a Cold War Imperative.”


CHAPTER ONE

1 Brown v. Board of Education, 347 U.S. 483 (1954).

2 Laws of North Carolina (1838–39), chap. 8, sec. 3, p. 13; North Carolina Advisory Committee, Equal Protection of the Laws, p. 99.

3 Lefler and Newsome, The History of a Southern State, p. 499.

4 Noble, A History of Public Schools, pp. 292–93, 2.96.

5 Williamson, The Crucible of Race, pp. 252–53.

-255-

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