Walter A. Rodney: A Promise of Revolution

By Clairmont Chung | Go to book overview

6—Amiri Baraka

When I met Walter, he was in Tanzania. He had just gotten sick, and he was in the hospital in Dar es Salaam. I talked to him a couple times there, before I left. That was the first time I met him, in Dar es Salaam. But I had known his writing, and I had heard about him from the people and the general kind of Pan-Africanist groups, and when I got to Tanzania, one of my closest friends there, Muhammad Babu,1 talked about Walter a lot. So I think we had a kind of cordiality among us based on what we thought—our ideological development, you see.

I went to Tanzania three times, and probably the last time was the Sixth Pan-African Congress.2 But now, it was clear to me that people who had been nationalists were sort of trying to find more solid ground as far as nationalism was concerned, because it was going into the whole cultural nationalist thing then and getting involved in a lot of atavism and worship of the past, and so forth and so on.

So there, Rodney was similar to Cabral3 in that he had a more materialist approach to the whole business of struggle. That’s what attracted me to him. One of the things Walter always said that was important to me was: “We cannot let racism and white supremacy deprive us of the most important things white people have said.” He

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Walter A. Rodney: A Promise of Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Acknowledgments 7
  • Abbreviations 8
  • Biographical Timeline 9
  • Preface 11
  • 1- Clairmont Chung 13
  • 2- Robert "Bobby" Moore 29
  • 3- Abbyssinian Carto 35
  • 4- Dr. Brenda Do Harris 59
  • 5- Robert Hill 65
  • 6- Amiri Baraka 71
  • 7- Leith Mullings 79
  • 8- Issa G. Shivji 83
  • 9- Clive Yolande Thomas 95
  • 10- Rupert Roopnaraine 109
  • Contributors 127
  • Notes 131
  • Index 149
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