Notes

Introduction

1Robert Kelly, Battling the Inland Sea: American Political Culture, Public Policy, and the Sacramento Valley, 1850-1986 (Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1989).

2Walter Prescott Webb, “The American West: A Perpetual Mirage,” Harper’s Magazine, 2.

3Gerald D. Nash, The American West in the Twentieth Century: A Short History of an Urban Oasis (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1985), 6; Edmund Wilson, The American Jitters: A Year of the Slump (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1932). See especially Wilson’s comments on Los Angeles, 224-244.


Chapter 1: On the Edge of a Desert Empire

1United States Senate, 51 Cong., 1 Sess, Report 928, Part 5, Report of the Special Committee of the US Senate on the Irrigation and Reclamation of Arid Lands, Vol. IV (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1890); Jack L. August Jr., Vision in the Desert: Carl Hayden and Hydropolitics in the American Southwest, 1999), 18; Frederick H. Newell, The History of Irrigation Movement: First Annual Report of the US Reclamation Service (Washington, DC: Government Printing Office, 1903). The USGS, under the direction of the Secretary of the Interior, would survey the arid regions of the West to determine to what extent the lands could be reclaimed by irrigation and to select sites for reservoirs for water storage and flood prevention. Significantly, the law withdrew from public settlement both the reservoir sites and the lands susceptible to irrigation from the water stored in them.

2Jack L. August Jr., “Carl Hayden: Born a Politician,” Journal of Arizona History (JAH) 26 (Summer 1985), 130-132.

3See Donald Worster, Rivers of Empire: Water, Aridity and the Growth of the American West (New York: Pantheon Books, 1985); Gerald Nash, The American West in the Twentieth Century: A Short History of an Urban Oasis (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1985); John Opie, “Environmental History of the West,” in Gerald Nash and Richard Etulain, The Twentieth Century West: Historical Interpretations (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1992).

4The resolutions were passed on April 7, 1889.

5Newell, History of the Irrigation Movement, 4, 5; Phoenix Daily Herald, April 9, 16, 1889.

6The survey’s expenses came to $599.67.

7McClintock was to be the scribe and write up the expedition.

8See Breakenridge’s autobiographical account, William M. Breakenridge, Helldorado: Bringing the Law to the Mesquite (Boston: Houghton Mifflen, 1928). An edited version, by Richard Maxwell Brown appeared in 1992, Richard Maxwell Brown, ed., Helldorado: Bringing the Law to the Mesquite (Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1992). Also see James H. McClintock, Arizona: A History of the Youngest State 1540-1915 (Phoenix, 1916). Breakenridge had a colorful history in the military and law enforcement. He was born on December 26, 1846 in Watertown, Wisconsin, and traveled to the Pike’s Peak mining area when he was just fifteen years old. Three years later, in 1864, he joined Company B of the Third Colorado Cavalry for service in the Civil War. He fought in the battle of Sand Creek and other encounters. In 1876 he arrived in Arizona Territory, ending up in Tombstone in 1880 where he was appointed a US Deputy Marshall under Sheriff Johnny Behan. In Cochise County he was courteous and prudent and resorted to gunplay only as a last resort. An excellent marksman, he was rarely challenged by outlaws. As a US Marshall he had unusual authority in the area. He was present

-244-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Norton Trilogy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword - The Honorable Jon Kyl, United States Senator vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - On the Edge of a Desert Empire 7
  • 2 - Corporate Water 29
  • 3 - Westward Tilt 55
  • 4 - John R. Norton Jr. and the Urban Oasis 93
  • 5 - Establishing Prior Rights 106
  • 6 - Depression to Empire 123
  • 7 - To the Other Side of the River 141
  • 8 - An Expatriate’s Dilemma- Arizona V. California 164
  • 9 - We Must Not Be Indecisive Lest We Be Ineffective 185
  • 10 - The Deputy Secretary of Agriculture 203
  • 11 - An Accurate Vision 219
  • Conclusion 239
  • Notes 244
  • Index 292
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 302

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.