Teaching and Christian Practices: Reshaping Faith and Learning

By David I. Smith; James K. A. Smith | Go to book overview

How Christian Practices Help to Engage Students
Morally and Spiritually: Testimony from a
Western Civilization Course

Glenn E. Sanders

I want to give testimony about the ways that Christian practices have changed my teaching.1

Specifically, over the past six or seven years I have puzzled often about how I might “step up” my moral and spiritual engagement with students. The ambiguous wording is deliberate. The accurate alternative involves some ugly repetition: I want to be a moral and spiritual person teaching moral and spiritual beings in moral and spiritual ways. I teach history, however, not ethics or religion. Moral and spiritual principles are important, but I am mainly interested in the ways those principles “play out” (or not) in the complexities of real life. Some understanding of those processes as experienced in the past should help my twenty-something students as they enter adulthood.

An appeal to Christian practices has helped me start accomplishing this goal. Practices have provided me new reasons and ways to encourage intellectual and emotional hospitality in the temporary classroom community. They represent specific elements of Christian spirituality that help

1. Thomas Hoyt Jr. defines testimony as the Christian practice in which “people speak truthfully about what they have experienced and seen, offering it to the community for the edification of all.” It “tells the truth. It also ties individuals to communities…. It guards the integrity of personal and communal life, as much on the grand stage of history as in the small exchanges of home.” (See his “Testimony,” in Practicing Our Faith: A Way of Life for a Searching People, ed. Dorothy C. Bass [San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997], pp. 92, 94, 103.) I have cast my report and analysis as testimony to suggest the permeating effect of Christian practices. Hoyt writes, “Christian testimony has two dimensions. One is testimony to the church and the world, where witnesses tell others about the action of God. The other is testimony to God, where witnesses tell God the truth about themselves and others” (p. 102).

-157-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Teaching and Christian Practices: Reshaping Faith and Learning
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 225

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.