Truffaut on Cinema

By François Truffaut; Anne Gillain et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 2
THE NEW WAVE

Each member remained true to himself, but, by so doing,
grew distant from the others. Have you seen Rossellini’s
film on Saint Francis of Assisi? It deals with this very same
phenomenon. It illustrates what happened to the New Wave.
At the end of the film, the monks are together, and they start
to spin round and round very quickly until they fall over.
When they rouse themselves, they get up and leave in the
direction in which they fell.

Interview with Chris Petit and Verina Glaessner, Time Out, no. 197,
November 30–December 6, 1973

Does the term “New Wave” reflect the reality?

I think that the reality of the New Wave was something that was anticipated rather than there from the beginning. The term was originally invented by journalists and then turned into something real. Nevertheless, even had this journalistic epithet not been created at the time of the Cannes Festival, I believe that the term, or some other like it, would have been created sooner or later once people started to become aware of the number of “first films” that were being made.

The concept of the New Wave originated as a result of an official survey conducted in France by some statistical service or another on French youth in general. Initially, the “New Wave” referred to future doctors, future engineers,

-21-

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