Truffaut on Cinema

By François Truffaut; Anne Gillain et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 13
MAY 1968

For me, De Gaulle’s only virtue was to oblige technicians
in television to create good framings. Whereas television
cameramen could not film a singer or a writer without
zooming into their nostrils, when they framed De Gaulle,
it was impeccable; they always left a bit of space above his
head, one could always see the knot of his tie—it was like
Dreyer.

Interview with Monique Sobieski, Journal du show-business,
no. 118, April 30, 1971

The “Cinémathèque affair” was a kind of prologue to the events of May. Of course, I didn’t realize that until later, in the light of May—but, in fact, in microcosm, there was somewhat of the same kind of situation: “intellectuals” who were contesting decisions (the government’s decision to get rid of Henri Langlois, the founder and soul of the Cinémathèque), and who were demonstrating in the streets and being bludgeoned. What the government officials did at the Cinémathèque is what they did across the whole of France: they subsidized organizations, and then they infiltrated them. During the demonstration at the Palais de Chaillot, I was bludgeoned, for the first time in my life, and I found that it was not as painful as all that. The clubs were made of rubber, or out of some sort of plastic material that was unknown to me, and, at one particular moment, I actually broke one. The experience “warmed

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