Truffaut on Cinema

By François Truffaut; Anne Gillain et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 19
1972: A GORGEOUS GIRL
LIKE ME

I love cinema to the point that I cannot bear the company of
people who do not like it. One day, I gave a ride in my car to
a German who was hitchhiking. I spoke to him about Fritz
Lang. He didn’t even know the name, nor of Max Ophüls—
and so, I made him get out of the car at Lyons, leading him
to believe that I was stopping there.

Interview with Monique Sobiesky, Le Journal du
show-business, May 21, 1971

Could you comment on A Gorgeous Girl Like Me, adapted from a novel by
the American writer Henry Farrell, and why it has been so poorly received?

This film was not made, as certain people assume, “to earn a crust,” to make up for the commercial failure of Two English Girls—in fact, the script for Gorgeous Girl had already been written. It was simply that I was attracted by another literary form: after the beautiful language of Roché, composed of short sentences, and marked by an incredibly refined sophistication, I turned my attention to a completely invented kind of language—a very coarse form of slang, but less vulgar than the kind Queneau used in the Adventures of Sally Mara.1 In addition, I wanted, in my own way, to even the score with respect to romantic love. When I was making Two English Girls, I knew that

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