Truffaut on Cinema

By François Truffaut; Anne Gillain et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 27
1980: THE LAST METRO

Renoir’s death was very distressing to me, at a personal
level. He had not declined intellectually at all, since he had
finished his book at Christmas and he died in February.
For Hitchcock, there was no way out. I knew that he was
doomed. He could no longer make films, and he did not
know how to do anything else—it was unbearable. What
most deeply affects me is that the generation who flourished
in the silent era have all died: Chaplin, Renoir, Hitchcock.
No one will ever make any more films like they did.

Interview with Anne de Gasperi, Le Quotidien de Paris, June 11, 1980

Love on the Run marked the conclusion of a series of your earlier films
(Stolen Kisses, Bed and Board, etc.). The Last Metro has been compared—
sometimes by you yourself—to
Day for Night; nevertheless, is it a film that
also relates to your whole oeuvre?

After you have made nineteen films, none of the themes you tackle can be entirely new! Each element always depends slightly on what precedes it. People follow what I am doing better when I add new elements while keeping one foot in the past. The Last Metro not only refers to Day for Night, but also to Jules and Jim, and even Stolen Kisses; but, in addition, I address a subject in it that I have never attempted before: theater, against a backdrop which I am not used to treating—the War and the Occupation.

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