Old and Sick in America: The Journey through the Health Care System

By Muriel R. Gillick | Go to book overview

Studies in Social Medicine

Nancy M. P. King, Gail E. Henderson, and Jane Stein, eds., Beyond Regulations: Ethics in Human Subjects Research (1999).

Laurie Zoloth, Health Care and the Ethics of Encounter: A Jewish Discussion of Social Justice (1999).

Susan M. Reverby, ed., Tuskegee’s Truths: Rethinking the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (2000).

Beatrix Hofman, The Wages of Sickness: The Politics of Health Insurance in Progressive America (2000).

Margarete Sandelowski, Devices and Desires: Gender, Technology, and American Nursing (2000).

Keith Wailoo, Dying in the City of the Blues: Sickle Cell Anemia and the Politics of Race and Health (2001).

Judith Andre, Bioethics as Practice (2002).

Chris Feudtner, Bittersweet: Diabetes, Insulin, and the Transformation of Illness (2003).

Ann Folwell Stanford, Bodies in a Broken World: Women Novelists of Color and the Politics of Medicine (2003).

Lawrence O. Gostin, The AI S Pandemic: Complacency, Injustice, and Unfulfilled Expectations (2004).

Arthur A. Daemmrich, Pharmacopolitics: Drug Regulation in the United States and Germany (2004).

Carl Elliott and Tod Chambers, eds., Prozac as a Way of Life (2004).

Steven M. Stowe, Doctoring the South: Southern Physicians and Everyday Medicine in the Mid-Nineteenth Century (2004).

Arleen Marcia Tuchman, Science Has No Sex: The Life of Marie Zakrzewska, M. D. (2006).

Michael H. Cohen, Healing at the Borderland of Medicine and Religion (2006).

Keith Wailoo, Julie Livingston, and Peter Guarnaccia, eds., A Death Retold: Jesica Santillan, the Bungled Transplant, and Paradoxes of Medical Citizenship (2006).

Michelle T. Moran, Colonizing Leprosy: Imperialism and the Politics of Public Health in the United States (2007).

Karey Harwood, The Infertility Treadmill: Feminist Ethics, Personal Choice, and the Use of Reproductive Technologies (2007).

Carla Bittel, Mary Putnam Jacobi and the Politics of Medicine in Nineteenth-Century America (2009).

Samuel Kelton Roberts Jr., Infectious Fear: Politics, Disease, and the Health Effects of Segregation (2009).

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Old and Sick in America: The Journey through the Health Care System
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Prelude ix
  • Abbreviations in the Text xxi
  • Part I - The Office 1
  • Chapter One - Going to the Doctor 3
  • Chapter Two - The Lay of the Land 23
  • Chapter Three - From the outside in 41
  • Chapter Four - The March of Time, 1965–2015 61
  • Part II - The Hospital 79
  • Chapter Five - Entering the Palace of Technology 81
  • Chapter Six - The Varieties of Hospital Experience 97
  • Chapter Seven - The Hospital through Other Eyes 113
  • Chapter Eight - The Transformation of the American Hospital, 1965–2015 133
  • Part III - The Skilled Nursing Facility 151
  • Chapter Nine - Going to Rehab 153
  • Chapter Ten - Different Snfs, Different Miffs 169
  • Chapter Eleven - Movers and Shapers 184
  • Chapter Twelve - Now and Then 202
  • Finale 223
  • Acknowledgments 245
  • Notes 247
  • Bibliography 267
  • Index 293
  • Studies in Social Medicine 301
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