Reconceptualizing the Literacies in Adolescents' Lives: Bridging the Everyday/Academic Divide

By Donna E. Alvermann; Kathleen A. Hinchman | Go to book overview

10
RE-WRITING THE STOCK STORIES OF
URBAN ADOLESCENTS
Autobiography as a Social and Performative
Practice at the Intersections of Identities

Kelly Wissman and Lalitha Vasudevan

In this chapter we draw from our work in two separate research contexts to explore how young people claimed autobiography as a social and performative practice with personal and socially transformative impulses and outcomes. Kelly’s research explores the literacy and artistic practices of young women of color enrolled in an in-school poetry and photography course named Sistahs, while Lalitha’s work documents the experiences of young men of color involved in a drama-based elective called Insight within an alternative to incarceration program. In our work, we were both drawn to a re-envisioning of educational spaces with urban adolescents as a “practice of freedom” that “connects the will to know with the will to become” (hooks, 1994). Within both research spaces, young people were involved in autobiographical explorations and collective meaning-making through the arts and literacies with each other and with adults. In both cases, young people also re-wrote the “stock stories” that surround them as urban adolescents.

In the development of our inquiry-based and participatory contexts designed with and for adolescents, our approach stands in contrast to the cultural construction of adolescents (Lesko, 1996, 2001) in which they are always and already known as “out-of-control and needing direction, knowledge, and discipline from adults” (Lesko, 1994, p. 147). This “biologically-determined view” (Lesko, 1994) of adolescence as a developmental stage and as a way station to adulthood most often translates into the creation of educational spaces and practices designed to contain and control. As Lesko (2001) contends:

Static ideas about youth have helped to keep in place a range of assump-
tions and actions in and out of secondary schools. For example, since

-160-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reconceptualizing the Literacies in Adolescents' Lives: Bridging the Everyday/Academic Divide
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.