Reconceptualizing the Literacies in Adolescents' Lives: Bridging the Everyday/Academic Divide

By Donna E. Alvermann; Kathleen A. Hinchman | Go to book overview

11
“IN THIS LITTLE TOWN NOTHING
MUCH EVER HAPPENS, BUT
SOMEDAY SOMETHING WILL”
Reading Young Adult Literature from
the Blue Ridge Foothills

Gay Ivey

Four 8th grade English teachers in a middle school in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley joined me several years ago in what seemed at that time a simple question with both theoretical and practical implications: What would it take to arrange for every student to become an engaged reader? The answer to that question centered largely on revamping the collection of reading materials available to students, from a limited variety of whole-class novel sets to a vast selection of edgy contemporary young adult fiction and giving students full control over selecting and responding to what they read. Little did we know what those choices and experiences would reveal about students’ personal lives and their capacities for using literacy to understand themselves and the world that extended far beyond their small town. In particular, we came to question our assumptions about the cultural reputation of this region of the country versus the complex, varied identities of the students living in it.

In this chapter, I hope to shed light on some misconceptions about what drives the interests of youth here and perhaps in other geographic or ethnic spaces associated with particular practices and ways of life. I will begin by describing common perceptions about culture in this region by sharing the evolution of my own association with this area of the country, starting as a tourist, then classroom teacher, then researcher. Next, I describe the engagement-focused study that led to new ways of thinking about the kinds of texts students want to read and how they work with those texts. My purpose is to inspire others working with adolescents, in places similar to this as well as in those markedly different, to reflect on the kinds of materials available to students and on what we expect students might do with the texts they prefer to read.

-181-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Reconceptualizing the Literacies in Adolescents' Lives: Bridging the Everyday/Academic Divide
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 280

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.