Governing Affect: Neoliberalism and Disaster Reconstruction

By Roberto E. Barrios | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This book and my career as an anthropologist would not have been possible were it not for a number of people who supported and educated me over the course of four decades of life. First among these people are my parents, María Teresa Castellanos Pasarelli and Domingo Everardo Barrios Díaz, who made tremendous sacrifices to provide me with the resources and experiences that shaped me as a person and as a professional social scientist. Academics, of course, also have scholarly families, and I am forever indebted to the educators and researchers who encouraged me to pursue anthropology as a field of study. At the University of New Orleans, Malcolm Webb, Ethelyn Orso, Richard Shenkel, and Richard Beavers all played key roles in my mentorship and encouraged me to pursue a graduate degree in anthropology. At the University of Florida, Anthony Oliver-Smith, James P. Stansbury, Allan F. Burns, Lynette Norr, and Stacey Langwick were instrumental in guiding me to develop an interest in applied anthropology, the anthropology of disasters, and the anthropology of development, as well as providing me with the means necessary to complete my graduate training and dissertation research.

My graduate development would not have been the same were it not for a number of fellow students who volunteered their friendships and developing professional expertise, among whom I count Lauren Fordyce, Debra Rodman, Jennifer Hale-Gallardo, Sarah Graddy, Antonio de la Peña, and Robert Freeman. The ideas and research interests I developed in graduate school also came to fruition over the course of my postdoctoral employment as an assistant professor at Southern Illinois University– Carbondale (SIUC), where a number of colleagues fostered the development of this book through casual conversations and helpful critiques. I am particularly indebted to Janet Fuller, Anthony K. Webster, Jonathan D. Hill, David Sutton, John McCall, René Francisco Poitevin, and Robert Swenson for making me a part of their intellectual communities and supporting my professional advancement.

-ix-

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