Governing Affect: Neoliberalism and Disaster Reconstruction

By Roberto E. Barrios | Go to book overview

References

Abu-Lughod, Lila, and Catherine Lutz. 1990. “Introduction: Emotion, Discourse, and the Politics of Everyday Life.” In Language and the Politics of Emotion, edited by Catherine Lutz and Lisa Abu-Lughod, 1–23. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Adams, Jane, ed. 2002. Fighting for the Farm: Rural America Transformed. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Adams, Richard N. 1970. Crucifixion by Power: Essays on Guatemalan National Social Structure, 1944–1966. Austin: University of Texas Press.

Adams, Vincanne. 1998. Doctors for Democracy: Health Professionals in the Nepal Revolution. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

———. 2013. Markets of Sorrow, Labors of Faith: New Orleans in the Wake of Katrina. Durham: Duke University Press.

Agamben, Giorgio. 1998. Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Allen, Greg. 2015. “Ghosts of Katrina Still Haunt New Orleans’ Shattered Lower Ninth Ward.” Morning Edition. National Public Radio, August 18.

Accessed December 12, 2015. http://www.npr.org/2015/08/03/42784 4717/ghosts-of-katrina-still-haunt-new-orleans-shattered-lower -ninth-ward.

Allison, Michael E. 2006. “The Transition from Armed Opposition to Electoral Opposition in Central America.” Latin American Politics and Society 48 (4): 137–62.

AMDC (Alcaldía Municipal del Distrito Central). 1999. Los Daños a la Capital en Cifras [Damage to the capital city in numbers]. Tegucigalpa: Alcaldía Municipal del Distrito Central.

Anderson, Mary B. 1994. “Understanding the Disaster-Development Continuum: Gender Analysis Is the Essential Tool.” Focus on Gender 2:7–10.

Appadurai, Arjun. 1996. Modernity at Large: Cultural Dimensions of Globalization. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Arce, Alberto, and Norman Long, eds. 2000. Anthropology, Development, and Modernities: Exploring Discourses, Counter-Tendencies, and Violence. New York: Routledge.

Audefroy, Joel B., and Bertha N. Cabrera. 2014. “Populations Déplacées par

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