Intersectionality: Origins, Contestations, Horizons

By Anna Carastathis | Go to book overview

PREFACE

At its core, this is a book about reading and listening. At times, as I wrote it, I was not sure I wanted to advance an argument to the extent it required me to shift from reading and listening to writing and speaking, and in a sense— since the argument centrally concerns the politics of interpretation and representation— to speaking for others. But since I have now done that, I want to preface what I have written with a story about the “locus of enunciation” of its author. The Cherokee-Greek writer Thomas King has said that “the truth about stories is that that’s all we are.” I tell this story with trepidation, vulnerability and apprehension, knowing that stories are “dangerous” as much as they are “wondrous”; we can become “chained” to them, and they cannot be called back; once told, they are “loose in the world” (King 2003).

I was born in 1981, the same year Cherríe Moraga and Gloria Anzaldúa first published This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color, across an ocean, on a different continent, probably in a different world. A decade later I would fly above that ocean and arrive on northeastern Turtle Island an “immigrant.” Still another decade would pass. In my early twenties, attending graduate school, I would come across this book for the first time in a university library (it would be none the worse for wear) in an attempt to educate myself with respect to women-of-color feminisms in an academic context where, to my disappointment and frustration, they were institutionally, disciplinarily, and phenomenologically underrepresented. Becoming absorbed in its

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Intersectionality: Origins, Contestations, Horizons
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Intersectionality, Black Feminist Thought, and Women-of-Color Organizing 15
  • 2 - Basements and Intersections 69
  • 3 - Intersectionality as a Provisional Concept 103
  • 4 - Critical Engagements with Intersectionality 125
  • 5 - Identities as Coalitions 163
  • 6 - Intersectionality and Decolonial Feminism 199
  • Conclusion 233
  • References 241
  • Index 263
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.