Intersectionality: Origins, Contestations, Horizons

By Anna Carastathis | Go to book overview

Introduction

How should we understand the concept of intersectionality given its ascendancy in feminist philosophy and in women’s, gender, and sexuality studies as the way to theorize the synthesis, co-constitution, or interactivity of “race” and “gender”? As it has traveled from margin to center, “intersectionality” appears to have become a cliché, a commonplace, or a “buzzword” that garners widespread agreement that axes of oppression are not separable in our everyday experiences and therefore must be theorized together (K. Davis 2008). In a progressivist narrative, intersectionality is celebrated as a methodological triumph over “previous” essentialist and exclusionary approaches to theorizing identity and power relations; viewed as a research paradigm (Hancock 2007a, 2007b), it has even been characterized as the “most important contribution that women’s studies has made so far” (McCall 2005, 1771), and is hailed as the inclusionary political orientation par excellence for the millennial generation (Hancock 2011). ॅ quarter-century has elapsed since the term “intersectionality” was theorized by the Black feminist legal scholar Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw, who introduced the metaphor in 1989 and further elaborated the concept in 1991. One of the founders of Critical Race Theory in the U.S. legal academy, Crenshaw is the most widely cited (if rarely closely read) “originator” of intersectionality, although her work inherits a much longer history of Black feminist thought traced to the nineteenth century. In the intervening twenty-five years, it seems feminist theory has very much “settled down” with intersectionality. On

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Intersectionality: Origins, Contestations, Horizons
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - Intersectionality, Black Feminist Thought, and Women-of-Color Organizing 15
  • 2 - Basements and Intersections 69
  • 3 - Intersectionality as a Provisional Concept 103
  • 4 - Critical Engagements with Intersectionality 125
  • 5 - Identities as Coalitions 163
  • 6 - Intersectionality and Decolonial Feminism 199
  • Conclusion 233
  • References 241
  • Index 263
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.