The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

Preface

Francis Joseph Attocknie

We would never attempt to piece together a history of the Comanche Tribe. Whatever we presented would not do justice to the strong, self-reliant, and able Comanche people who made our tribe’s brilliant history. Furthermore, it would be beyond the capability of any modern researcher to properly present the great and adventuresome Comanches of the past. The researcher would have to have a knowledge of that very first Comanche who found these bountiful plains, who drove away the inhabitants, and who stayed here to steadfastly confront the vast dangers that are always present where there is a land of plenty.

The researcher would also have to record that first Comanche who forked his limbs around a snorting, quivering mass of living horseflesh, thereby starting the movement that transformed his Comanches into a powerful horse people. He would have to record the Comanche as the first tribe to invade Mexico and successfully beat off the drilled and organized armies of that nation, the Royal Spanish Armies, the Imperial Armies of Maximilian, and the armies of the Republic of Mexico. He would have to record the first Comanche to exultantly charge head on into and engage in pitched battle with the blue-dressed cavalry soldiers of the United States of America. Comanches won glorious victories that still embellish proud Comanche history like precious jewels set in beautiful jewelry.

Still another formidable Comanche who must be properly represented was the first Comanche who braved the nerve-chilling, nightmarishly weird hallucinations known only to the novice eater of the sacred peyote plant. That cold-sweated Comanche gained today’s soul-satisfying musical worship of that divinely created peyote plant, called by its true worshipers the “Will of the Creator.” Although other peoples may have eaten peyote earlier, the present-day Peyote Religion is Comanche in origin. Comanche peyote music is, by far, the most imitated Indian music in America.

Truly worthy of historical recognition is the Comanche, who after thorough evaluation of conditions, old and new, the strength and frailties of humanity, braved what his war-glorying and plunder-seeking fellow tribesmen would derisively designate him—a mercy seeker (nahsutaru). This iron-willed Comanche was the first to lead his followers to the path

-3-

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