The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

5   Piakoruko’s War against the Apaches
| 1840 |

A Comanche war party engages Apaches in battle on the Staked Plains.

A Comanche horseman appears on a hill.

In the camp, the older men are smoking.

The horseman, who stayed on the hill, gave a report of the battle to those who hurried up to him. Those who hurried up received the news and rent their clothes.

Piakoruko, who had two sons in the battle, including Narahtukiwat, who was a captive but had been adopted, is smoking with the older men. The older men are anxious to hear the report of battle, but Piakoruko, although just as anxious, insists on finishing the smoke ritual.

Then a messenger is sent to the hilltop. Giving the messenger time, Piakoruko asks how it goes with the messenger.

Our messenger is now with the reporting horseman.

Our messenger has moved around from the right hand and is coming down the hill tearing his clothes.

Word finally reaches the anxious old man that Piatsukhubi had dismounted in front of the Apaches to make a final stand, as an armor-clad Apache turned the tide against the Comanches. His faithful adopted brother Narahtukiwat also dismounted to join him. Some more Comanches followed their example, and it was these dismounted Comanches that the ill tidings were about.

They had been killed where they had dismounted in front of the Apaches led by the armor-clad warrior.

The old warrior Piakoruko groaned and rubbed his breast near his heart after he asked about and was told of the fate of Piatsukhubi and his faithful companion Narahtukiwat.

“OnhHOnhHnOhOO! … Wahakoo, Wahakoo … OnhHOnhHnOhOO!”

There was mourning all over camp by the many relatives of the killed warriors.

The old warrior mourned for his sons, his grief being unbearable to him unless he could obtain a balm to rub on his aching heart. The only balm that would ease this pain was the sight of the armor-clad Apache; if it was impossible to kill the Apache, the next thing to it would be to be

-55-

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