The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

6   Where the Comanches’ Saddle Packs
Were Captured
ISAKWAHIP’S TRAGIC VICTORY
| ca. 1845–50 |

Tree leaves turning yellow (time of the year).

Attocknie was playing aratsi with a group of boys. The boys heard a man mourning as he rode along near where they were playing. The man had a black Mexican blanket draped over the front of his saddle, also a long silver scalp-lock ornament which dangled almost to the ground as the mourning man rode along. A young woman walked up to the mourner and wept with him, tearing her clothes and cutting herself on the arms in the manner of those Comanches who mourn for relatives or loved ones. She was stopped before cutting both arms.

A large Comanche war party was plundering deep in Mexico. As was usually the case, a mounted body of Mexican cavalry took up the trail of the Comanches and would not be discouraged by the sorties and ambushes which the Comanches initiated to drive them off. Day and night the shadowing troops followed the Comanches and even at times the Mexicans would attack the Comanches.

In one such attack, the Mexican troops succeeded in capturing some Comanche horses, supply packs, and saddles. Whence the Comanche name of the battle, Where the Comanches’ Saddle Packs Were Captured.

The Mexican troops had been closing in on the Comanches despite the battles the war party had given to the persistent red-dressed cavalry. This war party was composed mostly of Yamparika Comanches and included a much larger number of the older and less active warriors than was usual in such a group.

Besides their firearms, the cavalry was equipped with long lances, decorated with fluttering red pennons. The Mexican cavalry must have been waiting for more reinforcements, for when two different columns of cavalry joined forces with the original Mexican foe of the Comanches, the Mexican forces then began to close in with increased vigor. This force of white-mounted cavalry was fast overtaking the badly outnumbered Comanche warriors, most of whom were on foot. Some members of the

-60-

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