The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

8   Disaster in Coahuila
| 1856 |

Kuhtohyah, an A’aa, as the Comanches called the Crow Indians, had lived most of his life with the Comanches. This northerner gained the confidence of four young men, Ticeahkie, Pahtukwi, Attocknie—who had a Crow mother—and another whose name has been forgotten, the youngest member of the party, who went under his leadership to Coahuila for plundering and foraging. Kuhtohyah also had along a young Mexican captive woman whom he had appropriated for a wife.

When they got to Coahuila one of the first things they did was to come to a Mexican’s residence and plunder it, for there was no one home but two small boys. Kuhtohyah took the two boys captive and went on. They had not gone far before they became aware of pursuit, the boys’ folks had returned to miss them and immediately took up an effort to rescue or avenge them. The Mexican pursuit was too uncomfortably close to allow the Indians to do any more plundering, they had to spend all their time trying to evade the boys’ rescuers.

Kuhtohyah’s mount became lame and slowed the little party’s movements. After a day or so of this, Attocknie got a chance to tell the youngest member of the party that he was dissatisfied with the way things were going for them. He said we are not acquiring many spoils but only trying to run away from the boys’ folks. His suggestion that they separate from the others was promptly approved by the younger Comanche.

So they lagged behind and finally stopped to let the others move on, but before they had a chance to move off in another direction Kuhtohyah, correctly interpreting their action, turned and rode back on his limping mount to where they were and remonstrated with them.

They had firmly made up their minds to separate. He finally told them to at least stay with the group a little while longer, until they evaded their pursuers. Before the two withdrawers could convince him they’d had enough of his leadership, the Mexican pursuers had come up within striking distance and now attacked.

The Comanche leader’s mount being severely lame, he told the two Comanches he was talking to “dismount so we can fight them off.”

Guessing that Kuhtohyah wanted to fight, Attocknie, who was leading

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