The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

12   Tuhtahyuheekuh Evens the Score
against the Osages
| 1868 |

[At least one page of this narrative is missing.]

A village of Yamparika were called upon by the pahpanahn Encircling Ceremony to take part in an Osage scalp–hunting expedition.

In the preparations and dances that led up to the actual departure of the war party, one of the most active and zealous leaders was Petuponi, who wore a wide-brim cowboy-type hat with a long black feather stuck in the band. In fact, he seemed to be the originator as well as the backbone of the whole plan as he was to be seen and heard everywhere at one time.

Things went along very smoothly and it seemed that the eagerness for the thrill of battle was thoroughly permeated into the Yamparika warriors, the voice and activities of Petuponi probably having a lot to do with it.

The morning of the expedition’s departure arrived and during the hustle and bustle of hurried last-minute details, the very surprising fact got out that Petuponi had changed his mind about going looking for Osage scalps, he was still departing all right but he was taking a group of Yamparikas, including some warriors, down south toward Waco, Texas. Word had reached the Comanches that ripe, delicious watermelons and muskmelons were available for the trading in Waco.

Disregarding any possible penalties that their withdrawal from the scalp expedition might incur, the trade-bent Comanches, stubborn to the reasoning of their friends and relatives, went ahead with their trading preparations.

Onawia was a daring fighter, one of the most able warriors in the tribe, but he was one of those who were going into Texas with Petuponi. Close friends of Onawia came to his tipi in a final attempt to dissuade the well-known warrior from accompanying the sweet-seeking Comanches going south. Onawia good-naturedly but firmly rejected the persuasion of these, his very good companions and relatives. He sat toying with his lance, pushing its point into the fireplace ashes and withdrawing it, and repeating the performance.

-90-

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