The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

18   The Last Sun Dance, the Last Raid
| July 26, 1878 |

The last Comanche Sun Dance was held north of Fort Sill, near the Medicine Park turnoff. Patsokotohovit was the priest. Also present was Esitoi.

      ▸▸▸

Patsokotohovit, believing that trouble was imminent, sent his mother, ________,1 to bring his brass-mounted Winchester to the Sun Dance lodge. His mother, arriving without the Winchester, he sent her back after it.

Soldiers arrived at the Sun Dance lodge before his mother came again and opened fire on the unarmed dancers, killing all of them except Patsokotohovit, who came to at the Fort Sill hospital.

      ▸▸▸

Pasewa and Patsokotohovit left Fort Sill for a raid-excursion into west Texas. They found the country had been thickly settled. On their return home, they were imprisoned and later sent to Mount Sheridan to cut wood. Patsokotohovit axed their boss and the Indians went to west Texas again. Koeyah, Asetamy, Nahwats, among others, joined the diehard Comanches on this last excursion. About twenty Comanches composed this band.

On one occasion, Pasewa came up suddenly on a white man, who aimed at Pasewa and missed. Pasewa returned the shot and missed too. The white took aim again and missed again. When Pasewa loaded and took aim, the white cried out loudly and fell, taking refuge behind a small clump of weed. Pasewa shot through the weed. His shot knocked the white two or three steps away from the weed clump, killing him instantly.

When the diehards returned to Fort Sill, Pasewa stood trial for that killing but was acquitted.

-135-

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