The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

19   Esitoya’s Loyalty

[This narrative begins abruptly.]

The two Comanches hid and waited until the two Texans seemed on top of them, then with a bright flash, the loud report of a gun caused an instant halt to the Texans’ bubbling-like conversation, and all the Comanches heard was the sounds of quirt lashes and horses’ hooves going at their utmost speed. The two Comanches who had thrown the scare into the Texans joined the rest of their party.

One of the Texans had been near-dismounted when his horse suddenly shied from the gunshot; he had hung on somehow by putting a desperate grip on his saddle horn and was seen hanging on the side of his horse like a flopping blanket.

When at length the Texans stopped, they heard the laughter of the Comanches. One Texan gave voice to a series of loud, high-pitched exclamations and then bravely fired a shot toward the Comanches. When the Comanches moved on, the Texans made no move to follow them.

      ▸▸▸

The raiding party was not bearing good results. Then another factor entered the scene: rain clouds appeared and brought a heavy and continuous downpour. The Comanches became soaked to the skin; their tracks too, leaving an easily seen path through the muddy ground. The warriors’ main concern was to keep their weapons dry; they wrapped their arrows in their robes to keep them dry. As the rain continued, the blankets and robes became water soaked, and the arrows became wet and all but useless.

Texans had picked up the easily seen muddy trail and were known to be following at a distance. The Comanches’ only hope lay in outdistancing the numerically superior Texans as evading them in the muddy terrain was out of the question.

The war party came to a thickly wooded stream, although swollen by the continuous rains. They would have to cross as there was no choice with the Texans now too close for comfort. The Comanches followed along the flooded stream looking for a suitable place to cross; its thick woods afforded the Comanches concealment but their tracks still left a

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