The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

26   Violation of a Dance Ground

Some northern tribe came to visit the Comanches two or three miles southwest of what is now Anadarko, Oklahoma, the location was about a half mile south of where Hog Creek joins the Washita River. The visiting tribe made ready and started putting on a dance with their hosts as spectators. This visiting tribe, as part of the dance’s ceremony, erected a pole that had been suitably prepared. The visitors, after arranging the pole, took pains to let the Comanches know that it was forbidden for any spectator to pass between the ceremonial pole and a certain designated area. The dance started and was well on its way to reaching its climax, the interested hosts respecting that area that their northern visitors had designated tabooed territory.

The dance was going along smoothly, everything turning out just right. The visitors, singers and dancers, nor the host-spectators saw a mounted older Comanche until he was approaching close to the forbidden part of the ceremony grounds. Before anybody could raise a voice he had entered the tabooed tract, not only did he enter it but he unconcernedly shuffled his pony at a slow pace right on through that area before any of the surprised visitors could move. Not until after the old buck had already passed their Do Not Enter area did the visitors recover enough so that several of them sprang after the old-timer and his mount. They quickly caught up to him and grabbed his mount by the bridle reins, brought him up short, and led the old man, still mounted, back into the dance’s ceremony area. Respect for visitors caused the otherwise war-ready Wusipuhi to react with indulgence.

After much excited talk among the visiting tribe, a spokesman for them told the host Comanches that a very serious violation of the visitors’ ceremonial rules had been committed by the mounted old Comanche. The old Comanche’s mount and all of his personal apparel as well as everything else he had taken into that forbidden area would have to be taken from the old Comanche by the visitors as a price for the wrong the old man had committed.

The leader of the host Comanches, Patsokoneki, was asked to explain this to the old man, who by now was asking, “What are they doing to me?”

The visitors who had caught his bridle reins had made no move to relin-

-169-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.