The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

27   Pohocsucut and the Two Kiowas

A group of Comanche ex-horse-warriors were gathered for a storytelling session at Mount Scott. In the group were Attocknie and Pohocsucut. As past adventures were being related and commented upon, Attocknie, speaking to Pohocsucut, said that there was one action of which Pohocsucut never spoke, and now that it was so far in the past, he asked his good friend Pohocsucut to tell them about it. Attocknie was the more interested in it, as he had inadvertently picked that action’s recent locale for the campsite of a returning war party which he had successfully led into Mexico.

The old horse-warrior sat for moments before saying anything, then finally replied that yes, it was true, as Attocknie had said, that the action in which Pohocsucut had been involved was a long time past. So he said that he would tell them of it and then they would know why he never spoke or told of it.

The action had been one in which a trio of mounted warriors, the Yamparika Comanche Pohocsucut and two Kiowa warriors, had been involved. The two Kiowas were killed and the Comanche had suffered a gunshot wound in the foot between his ankle and the sole of his foot.

Pohocsucut, speaking in a low, soft tone, told of how the three of them had been attacked by a dozen or so Texas whites, not soldiers. The fury of the white attack had quickly forced the three Indians to give ground, and it was not long until Pohocsucut’s and one of his Kiowa friend’s mounts were shot down. As the two unhorsed warriors continued their retreat on foot, their still-mounted Kiowa companion done himself proud indeed, by a courageous fight in which he placed himself between his retreating, unmounted companions and the eager whites, who sensed an easy victory.

The mounted Kiowa made repeated rushes on the more ambitious whites and drove them off, thus slowing the attack. [illegible] When their mounted companion [illegible] whites, force [illegible] stop and [illegible] The element of surprise had tipped the scales of conflict to the disadvantage of the Indians, where but for the element of this surprise, these same numerical odds would have been considered even. The retreat ended when the Indians found a suitable refuge from which to fight off the whites. Their refuge was a fairly wide washout near a stream of water.

-172-

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