The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

29   Querherbitty

Querherbitty, the younger sister of Cheevers, remembered [that] she, being an orphan, had a hard and sometimes hungry struggle to get along. She told of the cold winter nights she somehow survived. She said she does not know how she was able to keep from freezing or dying from the effects of the cold manner in which she spent her shivering winter nights.

An instance that she plainly remembered about her childhood was her running around playing with a little boy of her own age. As they happily ran around chasing each other, the little boy told her to wait a moment and went into his family’s tipi, the little girl followed him in, and her playmate told his mother, who was in the tipi, that he wanted a piece of bread. Bread, even the hard variety that was obtained by trading with the New Mexico traders, was considered by the Comanches a real luxury. At the little boy’s request, his mother, rummaging around her goods, produced a small loaf of hard bread. She broke off a piece and gave it to the boy, who called his playmate and went out. The mother took a bite of the remaining portion and, as the little girl watched her, put the rest of it in a pot of meat that was boiling over the tipi fire.

The hungry little girl remembered the hard bread that was being softened in the soup as she chased about playing. They ran in and out of the tipis in their play. Once they ran into her playmate’s tipi again, the boy’s mother had went out and when her playmate ran out the little girl lingered momentarily then reached into the boiling pot and, disregarding the hot soup, fished out with her hand the piece of hard bread and put it in her dress bosom to cool off and ran out to play. The bread was hot as it touched her flesh so she had to hold the part of her dress that held the bread away from her with one hand as she ran about playing.

She plainly remembers another instance where she and some more girls were playing on a river, across from the village, and did not notice that the river was rising from some rains that had fallen upstream. They were not alarmed till they got ready to return to camp. Querherbitty was one of the smaller members of the group. The larger girls of the group decided to lead them back across the swollen river. They were told to all hold hands, the bigger girls at the leading end with the others in the order of their size, tapering down to the smallest girl at the tail end of the line.

-177-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.