The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives

By Francis Joseph Attocknie; Thomas W. Kavanagh | Go to book overview

32   Fragmentary and Incomplete Narratives

HAHTEE

[This narrative begins and ends abruptly.]

Hahtee and his companion stayed out of sight until the dog-leading Mexicans were well out of sight. When they felt it safe, they took up the trail of their ill-led war party.

When they finally overtook the other Comanches they told of how the Mexicans had turned back just before finding them. After they rejoined the party, they found that even without any pursuit to hamper their booty seeking, the leader of the party was not doing his followers any good. He was not finding any opportunities that could be turned to his followers’ gain. He was not mounting his followers on Mexican horses, which was a capable leader’s duty. Arduous travel that at times was made harder by suffering from thirst and hunger was the lot that had to be endured by the war party. Other foot-weary followers besides Hahtee had become discontented with their leadership.

Hahtee was hoping they would meet another party so he could separate from his present group and join them. After one of the many stops during all this fruitless wandering, the party bestirred itself and set out once more hunting for plunder. The party leaders moved off and Hahtee, starting along with the others, noticed that three members of the group were not making any move to follow the rest. When they did bestir themselves they moved off in another direction from that of their former war party. When he saw that these three stranger Comanches had withdrawn from the party, he hastened back and followed them, hoping to join them. When they saw him coming, they stopped and he came up to them.

Before Hahtee could say anything, one of them told him that he thought that maybe Hahtee shouldn’t come along with them, to go on and stay with the rest. To anybody less determined to take himself away from the leadership of the original leader of the war party, this rebuff would have surely been effective. Of these two groups, neither of which he realized wanted him, the smaller group was without question the only choice he could make. After more words the three withdrawers saw that Hahtee was firmly determined to go with them, so seeing nothing else to do they went on, with Hahtee following along after them.

-196-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Life of Ten Bears: Comanche Historical Narratives
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 228

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.