One Nation under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime

By John Florio; Ouisie Shapiro | Go to book overview

3

New York 1962. A bustling city of fedoras, chesterfields, and cigarettes. President Kennedy, on a visit to the city, took in the Broadway musical How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying. Louis Armstrong & His All Stars filmed a concert at Pathé Studios at 134th and Park. Twentyone-year-old folk singer Bob Dylan performed his newest song, Blowin’ in the Wind, at Gerde’s Folk City in Greenwich Village.

And corner newsstands hawked seven major dailies.

It seemed there was a paper for everybody. The well-heeled read the morning broadsheets, the New York Times and the New York Herald Tribune. Conservatives grabbed the afternoon broadsheet, the New York World-Telegram & Sun. Blue-collar readers had their pick of the massmarket morning tabloids, the Daily Mirror and the Daily News. Sports fans also picked up the afternoon tabloid, the New York Journal-American, or the city’s most liberal paper, the New York Post.

But on Sunday, December 9, the city’s 1,300 newsstands had no papers to sell.

In the wee hours of the morning, the Linotype machines in the Times’s composition room had stopped clattering, the presses stopped roaring. Members of Local 6 of the International Typographical Union, better known as Big Six, had grabbed their typewriters, coffee mugs, and lunchboxes and walked off the job. By the time the sun rose over the East River, nine other unions had joined them, shutting down the Times, the News, the Journal- American, and the World-Telegram & Sun.

Hours later, the publishers of the Herald Tribune, the Mirror, and the Post announced they, too, were suspending publication.

In all, more than nineteen thousand newspaper employees had gone on strike—and left New York baseball fans without a single paper with which to follow their teams.

-23-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
One Nation under Baseball: How the 1960s Collided with the National Pastime
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword Bob Costas vii
  • A Note to the Reader ix
  • 1 1
  • 2 8
  • 3 23
  • 4 31
  • 5 43
  • 6 51
  • 7 58
  • 8 65
  • 9 72
  • 10 86
  • 11 100
  • 12 111
  • 13 126
  • 14 129
  • 15 138
  • 16 150
  • 17 156
  • 18 164
  • 19 173
  • 20 180
  • 21 192
  • Epilogue- 1975 201
  • Acknowledgments 203
  • Bibliography 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 222

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.