Upstairs at the Roosevelts: Growing Up with Franklin and Eleanor

By Curtis Roosevelt | Go to book overview

9
Hostility of Eleanor Roosevelt
toward Her Mother-in-Law

Eleanor Roosevelt is an icon who stands apart among the many celebrities of the twentieth century. More than just a celebrity, she was a political figure both as first lady and, after FDR’s death, when she represented the United States at the United Nations. She continued to write her daily column, My Day. She also wrote regularly for magazines, published her autobiography, and appeared frequently on radio and television. In the last ten years of her life she wrote several books. With her overflowing diary of appointments she was seen as being always in perpetual motion.

During the White House years she had become loved by many Americans across the country—especially by women, because of her concern for them—owing to her compassion and her tireless energy as she worked to ease the pain of people suffering from the Great Depression and its aftermath. At the United Nations, more than any other delegate, she was the principal person behind the General Assembly’s passing of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. When she died, three presidents, Truman, Eisenhower, and Kennedy, as well as Vice President Lyndon Johnson, attended her funeral in the Rose Garden at our family house at Hyde Park, where she was buried next to her husband.

My grandmother was, and is, recognized as one of the

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