Upstairs at the Roosevelts: Growing Up with Franklin and Eleanor

By Curtis Roosevelt | Go to book overview

NOTES

2. Hyde Park, Our Family Home

1. Beebee, my nurse, being African American, was most unusual in our upper-class circle.

2. The breaststroke, the backstroke, and the sidestroke were considered, I was informed, most appropriate for ladies.

3. David McCullough writes about Sara Delano Roosevelt in Psychology Today, March 1983, 36: “She had standards, and she had the gift for making everybody want to measure up.”

4. Geoffrey Ward, A First-Class Temperament: The Emergence of Franklin Roosevelt (New York: Harper and Row, 1989), 48.


3. FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt

All quotations by Eleanor Roosevelt in this chapter are from The Autobiography of Eleanor Roosevelt (New York: Harper Perennial, reprint edition, October 21, 2014).

1. A book review by Seamus Perry in the Literary Review of December 2012 describes it: “the very idea of a Victorian, possessing the full mixture of suppressed turmoil, self blindness, and strenuous achievement.”

2. See chapter 9 in this book on Eleanor Roosevelt’s “taking against” her mother-in-law.

3. For a fuller picture of this incident, I refer the reader to Geoffrey Ward’s book A First-Class Temperament.

4. Lash’s account is what Eleanor Roosevelt told him, hence not altogether reliable. Many of her stories to Joe—and often to the rest of us just sitting around after supper at Val-Kill—were much embroidered. Only by reading the relevant correspondence, as I had to do when writing my book, does one clearly see this. See Joseph P. Lash’s biography Eleanor and Frank-

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