Tejano Tiger: José de Los Santos Benavides and the Texas-Mexico Borderlands, 1823-1891

By Jerry Thompson | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION

Geographically, South Texas is a giant wedge, an alluvial plain, thrust inland from the sea into the heart of the Lone Star State. This immense and uncompromising land is unlike any other region of Texas, physiographically, demographically, and historically. Stretching from the Balcones Escarpment and the Guadalupe River on the north to the Rio Grande on the south and the Gulf of Mexico on the east, South Texas comprised over thirty-nine thousand square miles, an area the size of Kentucky. The long hot summers, mild winters, and arid climate make the region nearly unique. It was on the vast sandy plains, along the banks of the Rio Grande and the Wild Horse Desert, where vast herds of bison and wild mustangs once roamed freely. Along the Guadalupe, San Antonio, and Nueces rivers, but especially along the Rio Grande, the fourth longest river in North America, the region’s rich and fascinating history took shape. Eight decades before the Pilgrims arrived at Plymouth and seven before the first Englishman walked ashore at Jamestown, Spanish explorers, many of them from Estremadura in western Spain, an arid land similar to South Texas, roamed the parched landscape and came in contact with the native peoples of the region, the Coahuiltecans and Karankawas. In this clash of races and cultures, the Native Americans perished by the thousands.

A half century before the United States existed as a nation, Franciscan priests in search of gold and souls built missions along the waterways of South Texas. Here settlers established the first cattle ranches in what would eventually become the United States. Along the banks of the Rio Grande, a series of nineteenth-century wars helped determine the boundaries of two

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Tejano Tiger: José de Los Santos Benavides and the Texas-Mexico Borderlands, 1823-1891
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents v
  • Editor’s Foreword vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter I - Revolutions without End 5
  • Chapter II - "Mexico Has Lost Laredo Forever." 35
  • Chapter III - Secession and Civil War 80
  • Chapter IV - Cotton and Blood 135
  • Chapter V - Forsaken Corner of the Confederacy 159
  • Chapter VI - Peacemaking on the Border 208
  • Chapter VII - Beyond the Memory of Living Men 230
  • Chapter VIII - Ballots and Bullets 279
  • Chapter IX - International Diplomat 311
  • Epilogue 325
  • Notes 333
  • Bibliography 379
  • Index 393
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 412

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.